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All photos in & around Assen

Showing items 401 to 494 from total of 494 items. Ordered by photo # descending.

Photo # Icon Photo Caption Categorisation
11804Photo #11804The centre of Assen. As ever this demonstrates the wide demographics of cyclists in the Netherlands.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11803Photo #11803Assen town centre. The road isn't compltely pedestrianized, however motor vehicles are not allowed here all the time. In practice this works very well for cycling.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11802Photo #11802Start of a combined cycle and car underpass. Note how the bike part doesn't go so deep as the car bit because it doesn't have to allow for high vehicles. Because of this, the gradients are less for cycles. Also note that this is a bidirectional path, but is on both sides of the road.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11801Photo #11801Long cycle underpass which goes beneath the railway, railway station and two roads roads. The cycle path is four metres wide. For some of the distance it also has a 2 metre pavement for pedestrians, but at this end they come out in a separate place.

Watch the video to see the underpass in use.

This provides a very well used route between housing to the east of the railway line and the city centre.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11800Photo #11800Segregated cycle path in Assen. This would be exceptional by UK standards, with side roads giving way to the bike path etc. However, it now falls below what is required here, the tiles are a little bit rough and the width is just 3 metres. It is scheduled for renewal in a couple of years and will become a four metre wide tarmac path.

February 2009: The path has now been resurfaced. See #15787
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11787Photo #11787Bridge on cycle path in Assen. This is a very old cycle path crossing an even older bridge. The path is 3 metres wide, but narrows to a mere 2.5 metres over the bridge. This is the narrowest cycle path I've found in this area.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11786Photo #11786Part of Eliza's commute to and from school. Despite appearances, this is very much an _urban_ cycle route. It just happens to pass through one of the many small woods in Assen.

The path is tarmac and very smooth and wide with no signs of the roots of any of those trees breaking through the surface.

As it is not a major route, this is narrower than usual: just 3 metres wide.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11785Photo #11785This minor road is about to turn into a dirt track passable only by tractors... but not for cyclists, who continue to have a nice smooth tarmac surface to ride on. Watch the video to see how this work.

One of the great advantages of a primarily segregated network is that it's so easy to make conditions for cyclists better than conditions for motorists.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11784Photo #11784A view from a bridge of the canal path shown in #11713.

This lovely bike path is very well used by cyclists, roller skaters etc.

Upgraded in 2011. See #33320

It is the standard width of four metres wide.

For a video of this path see #11873.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11783Photo #11783Another view of the bridge shown in #11525 and #11526, but with a cyclist for scale showing how wide the cycle path is: four metres.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11782Photo #11782When there isn't a cycle path, speed limits on the roads are low. The speed limit on this rural road is 50 km/h, or around 30 mph.General sign/notice:
Good practice
signs
11781Photo #11781Following a group of "racers" into the village of Zeijen.

They've been riding three abreast for as long as I've seen them with no trouble whatsoever from any traffic. The sign indicates the speed limit on all the village's roads, including the main one through the middle, in km/h, so this equates to around 18 mph.
Bicycle:
Good practice
bicycles
11780Photo #11780Yet another example of a side road giving way to a cycle path. This is the other side of the road from the sequence shown from #11773.

Note how the 2.5 m wide concrete surface passes through the road. Cyclists definitely have priority here.

It's also worth a look at the Google Maps images which show how this road junction used to be. The road always gave way to the cycle path, but the road entrance used to be much wider and with more sweeping "high speed" corners than it has now.

By British standards, the previous arrangement would have been truly exceptional, but the Dutch have moved past that to a safer arrangement, despite the inconvenience to drivers.

Note that the crossing is set back from the main road by more than a car length in order that cars entering or leaving the main road have somewhere to stop without blocking the route of cyclists. Also note that this is achieved with very large radii corners for cyclists to negotiate, while drivers have to negotiate much tighter radii in order to turn in or out of the road.

To see the way that this path continues right into the city, see the video at #12598
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11779Photo #11779The cycle paths in the Netherlands are suitable for high speed riding and are well used by racing cyclists travelling at speed.

They're difficult to photograph as they're difficult to keep up with. I huffed and puffed on my 3 speed to get within striking distance of this guy before he disappeared into the distance.

This is the cycle path on the other side of the road from the sequence shown from #11773. Another view of this path showing the treatment of a side road is shown in #11780.

To see the way that cyclists get from this path into the city, see the video at #12598
Bicycle:
Good practice
bicycles
11778Photo #11778We started in Assen and now we're in the middle of Vries - almost half way to Groningen. To get here we have followed a fantastic smooth and wide cycle path to which side roads give way, and now that we're in Vries, for the first time in many kilometres we're being asked to give way to cars.

The bike path continues to Groningen, but this is the last photo of our sequence.

The first photo was #11773. Start back there and to see all the photos and videos of this sequence. Or if you want to see a few views of the return path on the other side of the road, go to #11779 and #11780.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11777Photo #11777Cycle path going smoothly behind a garage in order to prevent cyclists having to be careful of drivers entering and leaving the garage forecourt.

Note that an equivalent quality cycle path on the other side of the road is used by cyclists heading in the opposite direction.

Part of a sequence which starts at #11773 and ends at #11778 showing a well used commuter route. #11778 is the next part.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11776Photo #11776Bus stop with covered cycle parking behind in the wooden shed. It is very common for bus stops to have cycle parking, and on a work day they are very well used (this photo was taken on Sunday morning).

This is part of a sequence of photos from #11773 to #11778. #11777 is the next part.

Note that the cycle path is between the bus-stop and the cycle parking. Cyclists do not get cut up by buses using this stop.
Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
11775Photo #11775Arriving in Vries from Assen. We've had a journey of around 6 km so far on this superb path. The sequence of photos starts at #11773 and ends at #11778. #11776 is the next part.

There is an identical path on the other side of the road for cyclists heading in the opposite direction.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11774Photo #11774Continuation of cycle path to the next town,. This is part of a sequence of photos and videos starting at #11773 and ending in #11778. #11775 is the next part.

This is unidirectional, there is an identical path on the other side of the road for cyclists heading in the other direction. Because it is unidirectional it can be narrower at just 2.5 metres wide.

The concrete surface is extremely smooth. Watch the video and you'll see how side-roads give way to this bike path.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11773Photo #11773Four metre wide cycle path past an industrial estate. Very wide and well used, even at the weekend.

Note the racing cyclist coming in the opposite direction. People ride such bikes at speed on these paths quite freely because they are good enough in quality to use at speed.

Also note that at the road crossing the light is green for us before we arrive. This is because this junction defaults to being green for bikes. Drivers who wish to turn into or leave the side road have to wait for the light to change. Also, we can go straight across several lanes of road with no problems at all.

After viewing this photo and video, please keep going forwards in sequence. The next photo in the sequence is #11774.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11728Photo #11728An example of excellent segregation of bikes and cars on a brand new housing estate. Bikes are this side of the water, cars are the other side of the water.

This cycle path is 3 metres wide.

In this case, both cars and bikes are allowed on both sides, but of course as cars can't get out at this end of the path on this side, no through motor traffic arises here, leaving a very quiet space for people.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11722Photo #11722The canal is crossed by a series of lifting bridgesOther:
Infrastructure
general
11721Photo #11721Segregated cycle facility... We're this side of the canal, the cars are the other side of the canal.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11720Photo #11720These arches over the cycle path appear to have been installed for no reason other than that they're nice to have.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11719Photo #11719Nice smooth tarmac cycle path through the countryside in the middle of nowhere.

There is an enormous network of these. They're ideal for recreational rides.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11718Photo #11718Nice wide cycle path near recreational areas outside the city.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11717Photo #11717This very narrow road gives way to two different cycle paths within 50 metres of one another.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11716Photo #11716Excellent new cycle paths in a new housing estate providing for families to ride bikes with children in complete safety.

The main cycle path is four metres wide. It is crossed by a 3 metre wide path with a 2 metre pavement alongside.
Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
11715Photo #11715Excellent new cycle path in the standard four metre width.

This path links the new development of Kloosteveen with Assen in the Netherlands.

#11714 includes video near this location.

This cycle path, between the new development and the city, was built with the equivalent of "planning gain" or S106 money, so cost the council nothing.

For more on Kloosterveen: hembrow.blogspot.com/search/label/kloosterveen
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11714Photo #11714Excellent cycle path in the standard four metre width. Following from the video which gets us to this location, watch #12118 which follows on from here.

This cycle path, between the new development and the city, was built with the equivalent of "planning gain" or S106 money, so cost the council nothing.

For more on Kloosterveen: hembrow.blogspot.com/search/label/kloosterveen
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11713Photo #11713Nice wide path alongside the canal. There's enough space here for four bikes abreast, so if you're riding with a friend and someone else is riding with a friend in the opposite direction it doesn't cause a problem. Pedestrians and dog walkers have another path the other side of the ditch to the right in the photo.

Note also the demographics of cycling in the Netherlands. The two women at the front are of pension age and out for a spin on a Sunday afternoon. Following closely behind is a young couple with a baby on the bike, followed by a middle-aged couple. Everyone cycles here.

This path is 4 metres wide.

For another view, see #11784 or for video see #11873.

Upgraded in 2011. See #33320
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11687Photo #11687Cycle path alongside Het Kanaal. The road is on the opposite side of the canal behind the vegetation to the left of the image.

This degree of segregation combined with excellent quality cycle paths makes cycling a pleasure. It also makes cycling a lot more convenient than driving.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11686Photo #11686Crossing Het Kanaal on an excellent bridge. There are many such bridges. The bike path is on the far side of the river while the road is on the side where the camera is.

There are countless bridges like this in the area and it's perhaps worth nothing that every single one has a non-slip surface so that it is safe to use when wet.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11685Photo #11685Bike path junction with road. Once you get away from this junction, excellent segregation between road and cycle path is achieved by the road being on this side of Het Kanaal (a canal), while the cycle path is on the opposite side (in the next two photos).

While the give way marks are on the cycle path at this junction, in practice I find that drivers give way to bikes at least as often as the other way around.

The central reservation doesn't look very wide in this view, but it's actually plenty wide enough for a cyclist to wait in the middle, even if riding a tandem or pulling a trailer.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11684Photo #11684Crossing the entrance / exit from a new underground carpark. Unusually, bikes give way to cars at this point, though as very few cars ever seem to be here it doesn't cause a problem.

Perhaps the choice of priority is determined by driver's outlook being obscured.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11683Photo #11683This photo has been superseded by the photo and video at #12360.

Bikes inside a covered mall shopping area in Assen parked outside the Albert Heijn supermarket.

No-one seems to mind bikes being ridden through here. They also don't worry too much about dogs being taken through here. I've even seen a dog being towed through in a bike trailer. No-one bats an eyelid. How different from the UK !
Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
11682Photo #11682A different style of bike parking. This rack grips the wheel but is not a "wheelbender" because it grips a larger proportion of the circumference of the wheel. There is an extra arm which holds bikes more securely and allows for locking. Also the wall around the cycle parking helps to keep bikes secure. Note that while an enormous amount of parking is provided (see "More photos nearby"), it still isn't nearly enough and a lot of bikes are parked elsewhere.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
11681Photo #11681More of Assen's bikes by the Koopmansplein.

Note that the "wheelbender" type of rack shown here is quite common but does not cause the problems you might expect due to being a little larger in size than often seen in the UK.

It is quite normal for very practical bikes to be seen parked all the way around the plein.
Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
11680Photo #11680Bikes parked next to the Koopsmansplein in Assen. There is a similar layer of bikes all around the plein as you can see if you look closely next to the ice cream stall at the far side. Some bikes are parked at stands, but while there are a huge number of stands this still isn't enough for all of Assen's bikes. Luckily most people ride sensible bikes with stands and build in locks which can make the most of spaces without racks. Cycle theft is relatively low here.

Assen has slightly lower than the national average of cycle journeys at "just" 37% (yes, thirty seven percent) of journeys by bike, which apparently translates into 70000 journeys per day by bike in a city with a population of 63000.
Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
11679Photo #11679Entering a lower capacity street. This is a single direction bike path leading to a low speed street with on street bike lanes.

The woman in the red jacket is on the wrong side of the road. Building paths as wide as they are here means that such mis-use doesn't cause any immediate problem. Also note that the people on the pavement are well clear of the cyclists.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11678Photo #11678Brand new fully segregated path approaching a junction. Note how the entrances for driveways are kept deliberately narrow so that drivers have to take care crossing the cycle path.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11677Photo #11677New segregated provision replacing older style hybrid path.

Note how plenty of room is given for overtaking, for car doors etc. and how cyclists are sensibly segregated from both pedestrians and motorists.

Where the path meets a side road, it takes a line such that the conflicts are reduced and cars give way to cyclists.

This is, of course, a single direction path. There is also an identical one on the other side of the road.

Note how in the video you cross a side road which has give way markings either side of it. This is to give cyclists priority over traffic emerging from the side road and over cars turning into the side road.

For more on Groningerstraat:
hembrow.blogspot.com/search/label/groningerstraat
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11676Photo #11676New properly segregated path replacing older hybrid style provision. Also note that the road is being reduced from three lanes at this point to two.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11675Photo #11675New not yet completed cycle path replacing older "hybrid" pathCycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11635Photo #11635You see these posts around occasionally. It reads (English first, then Dutch):

This is a climate wood. These trees are at this moment busy tieing up CO2. That is desperately needed, for CO2 discharge is an important cause of climate change.

The 12 provincies and landscape organisations work here on the solution to the climate problem.

And what are you doing ?

Look at www.klimaatbosje.nl

Dit is een klimaatbosje. Deze bomen zijn op dit moment bezig CO2 te binden. Dat is hard nodig, want CO2-uitstoot is een belangrijke oorzaak van klimaatverandering.

De 12 provinciale Landschappen en landschapsbeheer Nederland werken hier aan de oplossing van het klimaatprobleem.

En wat doet U ?

Kijk op www.klimaatbosje.nl
General sign/notice:
Good practice
signs
11627Photo #11627When service vehicles (this is is for an electricity and gas supply company) need to access areas which are only accessible by bike and footpath they can do so without greatly inconveniencing cyclists too much because the paths were built with sensible proportions in the first place.

Also, because this is just a bike path and not a road, no amount of irresponsible parking can result in cyclists having to ride out into fast flowing traffic.

Photo taken in Assen, Netherlands.

The cycle path is four metres wide, the pavement 2.5 metres.
Obstruction:
Good practice
obstructions
11626Photo #11626Sound barriers being installed along a road which is being widened in Assen.

The road is being widened from 1 lane each way to 2 lanes each way. Even though the road will have only a 70 km/h speed limit (44 mph), the problem of noise from roads is thought to be serious enough that the sound needs to be stopped.

Note the scale of these barriers. They're substantial concrete at least 3 m tall, with occasional see through plastic panels to be added later.
Other:
Good practice
general
11625Photo #11625Excellent bike path and pavement next to one of the Kinderboerderijen in Assen. There's some kind of donkey in that field if you look closely.

This is one of our alternative routes to one of the schools and to the centre of the city.
Other:
Good practice
general
11624Photo #11624Kinderboerderij in Assen. This is a city farm for children (and adults) to visit. Most residential areas across the country have one of these. We know of six in Assen so far.

Like many such things, this is not car friendly at all. It is reachable only by bike or on foot.

If you look closely near the centre of the image you'll see that a few chicks have escaped through the fence onto the footpath.
Destination:
Good practice
destinations
11623Photo #11623Single stage crossing of very wide road, both the road and bike path have been upgraded since the google maps imagery was created.Other:
Good practice
general
11622Photo #11622Four metre wide and smooth bidirectional bike path beside a very large road. Note that all cycle crossings of this road are single stage crossings.Other:
Good practice
general
11621Photo #11621Four metre wide, smooth bidirectional bike path next to large road.Other:
Good practice
general
11620Photo #11620High capacity bike path and road crossing. The priority here may not be obvious to English viewers. The Dutch expect to give way to traffic from the right at junctions like this, so priority for bikes and cars is equal.Other:
Good practice
general
11619Photo #11619Junction between bike paths, all some distance from roads. Note also that the grey concrete is a separate pavement. Shared use paths are not used in the Netherlands (though sometimes pedestrians do walk on bike paths).

However, first go back to #11615 and press next until you get back here to see a sequence of photos before the video.

After this video, take a look at #12346 which shows a view of the same path going in the opposite direction and nearly reaching the same spot as this one does.
Other:
Good practice
general
11618Photo #11618Fully segregated bike path in 30 km/h residential area. The path takes a more direct route than the road, and drivers in cars have to give way when the path and road cross.Other:
Good practice
general
11617Photo #11617Fully segregated bike path in 30 km/h residential area.Other:
Good practice
general
11616Photo #11616Fully segregated bike path in 30 km/h area. The road gives way to the bike path at this junction, where the path and road crossOther:
Good practice
general
11615Photo #11615Full segregated bike path in area with 30 km/h speed limit.

This gives benefits because traffic calming can be applied to the road while cyclists continue unimpeded.

At crossings, drivers give way to cyclists.

Also, cyclists can take a more direct route through the area than drivers.
Other:
Good practice
general
11604Photo #11604Hunebed near Assen. Drenthe has quite a lot of these ancient monuments, and they're reachable easily by bike.

And yes, you do seem to be allowed to climb all over them.
Destination:
Misc
destinations
11580Photo #11580Cycle path crossing the entrance to a 30 kph minor road in a residential area in Assen. The road gives way to the cycle path.

Note that the cycle path is raised above the road, and where the road crosses the cycle path it rises to the same height, creating a "speed bump". The road on the left has a 30 km/h speed limit, the larger road on the right a 50 km/h speed limit.
Other:
Good practice
general
11579Photo #11579Traffic safety is taken very seriously at the school. It's already well in advance of that at a typical British school. No parking of cars on the pavement and a very high rate of cycling and walking. However, this is clearly something which they feel needs to be re-enforced:

Junior version of the highway code "Do you know the traffic rules?"

Handed out to all Dutch primary school children.
Other:
Good practice
general
11578Photo #11578Traffic safety is taken very seriously at the school. It's already well in advance of that at a typical British school. No parking of cars on the pavement and a very high rate of cycling and walking. However, this is clearly something which they feel needs to be re-enforced:

Another leaflet from school

"Safe crossings"

Together we stand strong


A leaflet about Veilig Verkee Nederlands (Safe Traffic Netherlands) www.veiligverkeernederland.nl

This calls for safer areas around schools.
Other:
Good practice
general
11577Photo #11577Traffic safety is taken very seriously at the school. It's already well in advance of that at a typical British school. No parking of cars on the pavement and a very high rate of cycling and walking. However, this is clearly something which they feel needs to be re-enforced:

Dutch handout given to school children for their parents.

10 Golden Rules for safe school surroundings

1. The route to school is safe
2. The street in front of school is safe
3. There is a safe crossing place
4. ... and a safe school exit
5. Children have an unimpeded view
6. For parents there is ample waiting space
7. There are bicycle racks for parents
8. ... and for the children good cycle parking with free places
9. The school bus takes the best parking space
10. The school has a traffic-parent and a traffic committee.

The leaflet goes on to explain each point in more detail.

More information at www.veiligverkeernederland.nl
Other:
Good practice
general
11574Photo #11574Access roads used for very local traffic and parking are sometimes shared with cycles. This example shows how a cycle path changes into an access road. The one way restriction applies only to motorists. Cyclists can use the road in both directions.

This is an example of how to achieve segregation of modes without cycle paths:

hembrow.blogspot.com/search/label/segregationwithoutcyclepaths
Other:
Good practice
general
11573Photo #11573Down a gentle slope at the biggest high-rise in Assen there is a good bike shop and watched cycle parking.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
11572Photo #11572Nicely segregated path leading to the city centre.Other:
Good practice
general
11571Photo #11571Cycle lane separating from road at the junction. The cycle traffic light is several metres beyond the traffic light for cars, and the green for bikes comes a couple of seconds before the green for motor vehicles. This gives cyclists a head-start.

This provision is not very common any more as even with this, it was still possible for right turning drivers to collide with cyclists. As a result, modern design separates motor vehicles and cycles in both time and space.

However, this older provision is safe enough in this location because there is no right turn allowed for car drivers.

It will probably will be replaced in the next few years by something that looks more like #11676
Other:
Good practice
general
11570Photo #11570Cycle path seamlessly turning into a Cycle Lane. Car parking is on the road side of the path and there is separation so that incidents with car doors should be unlikely.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11569Photo #11569Cycle path crossing a road. Cars give way to bikes in both directions.Other:
Good practice
general
11568Photo #11568At this point the single direction cycle path becomes bidirectional for a short section to allow more efficient use of the crossings. It's all wide, smooth etc.

At this point, cars are restricted by central bollards in the road and such like without it being in any way dangerous for cycles.
Other:
Good practice
general
11567Photo #11567This cycle path is separated by grade from the road. It is around 2.5 m wide + a different colour section which keeps it apart laterally. At the junction it becomes more widely spaced from the road.Other:
Good practice
general
11566Photo #11566A cycle path crossing a road. The cars give way to cycles in both directions. This is short of Maria in Campislaan, which is parallel to the bike path on the left in this photo, by a car width so that one car at a time trying to pull out of the minor road can wait in the appropriate place.

I have crossed this junction on many occasions now and have yet to find a car that does not give way to me on a bike. They also will go out of their way to pull back not to obstruct you if they are in the way.

The photo is taken from an older 2.5 m wide single direction path but at the other side there is a 4 metre wide bidirectional path. Note the separate 2 metre footpath both sides of the crossing.
Other:
Good practice
general
11564Photo #11564Segregated cycle lane turning into a proper cycle path.

This type of provision widely spaced from the road is replacing the old fashioned hybrid style lane.

The video shows the same place on the 21st of December when the temperature was -4 C. This like all other paths had been salted/gritted and was safe to use. Note how the cars give way to me on my bike.

The initial bit of path which is not properly segregated is scheduled for replacement, perhaps in 2009.
Other:
Good practice
general
11563Photo #11563Segregated ( "hybrid") cycle lane.

It's an old facility and at 2.3 m wide it is narrow. However, this is still enough to be able to pass slower cyclists within the lane. It's not that unusual to see three bikes side by side when kids are going to school in this lane at busy times.

While provision like this is pretty much unknown in the UK, note that this style of provision is in the process of being removed in favour of properly segregated paths.

The road here has a 50 km/h speed limit. You almost never find yourself riding on a road with this speed limit.

The other side of the road (where the camper van is parked) there is a service road with a 30 km/h speed limit which doubles as a bidirectional cycle path, so no-one should ever have to make the potentially unsafe maneuver of a left turn from the cycle lane which is the subject of the photo.

Update: I've discovered that this is scheduled to be updated. I expect it will be changed to a proper segregated path as others have been. e.g. this one: #11676. It will probably be changed for either a 2.5 m wide segregated single direction path or a 4 m wide segregated bidirectional path.
Other:
Good practice
general
11562Photo #11562Cycle path junction with road and merging into segregated cycle lane.

This style of "hybrid" cycle lane is old fashioned and therefore narrower than current practice. It is 2.3 metres wide.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11537Photo #11537A brand new Dutch housing estate, showing cycle paths which go everywhere. It's also very pleasantly landscaped, doesn't look crowded and doesn't prioritise cars above all else.

The path is four metres wide.
Other:
Good practice
general
11536Photo #11536Emerging from a cycle underpass. Almost central in the image on the right of the path is parking for the bus stop (but no sign as it's being redone at present).

When I took this photo, I thought this path seemed perfectly smooth. There were a few imperfections but no pot-holes. So, you can imagine my surprise at seeing the surface replaced a few months later due to it being "rough": #12933

The cycle path is four metres wide. The pavement is 2.5 metres.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11535Photo #11535Cycle and pedestrian underpass. It's wide, smooth and avoids a set of traffic lights.

The cycle path is four metres wide, the pavement is 2.5 m.

When I took this photo, I thought this path seemed perfectly smooth. There were a few imperfections but no pot-holes. So, you can imagine my surprise at seeing the surface replaced a few months later due to it being "rough": #12933
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11534Photo #11534At this point, minor access roads are linked by short sections of cycle path producing a direct route for bikes but not for cars. While it may look like the junction loses priority for bikes, it does not. The Dutch traffic laws expect both drivers and cyclists to give way to the right at junctions like this, so the cars wait for you when you emerge on your bike.

This is an example of older infrastructure, possibly dating from the 1970s as do many of the houses around here.

The video was taken a while after the still. The post shown in the still had been removed to allow access for some nearby works.
Other:
Good practice
general
11533Photo #11533Dutch primary schools don't have gates. They do have very good cycle paths, though. This path is the standard width: four metres. The pavement is two metres wide.

This is actually a temporary school in a new housing estate.

You can see another route to this school here:
www.youtube.com/watch
Other:
Good practice
general
11532Photo #11532Cycle path in new housing estate. Full segregation where there is a 30 km/h speed limit on the road. Note that the cycle path is smoother, wider and more direct than the road and at crossings, drivers have to give way to cyclists.

The cycle path is four metres wide, the pavement is two metres wide.
Other:
Good practice
general
11531Photo #11531Here a cycle path cross roads crosses a road. Note that the cycle path is four metres wide, smoothly surfaced and takes a direct route. The road is three metres wide, bumpy and takes an indirect route.

The first crossing with a bumpy grey path is the road. The second crossing with a red smooth path is another cycle path.

This is an example of full segregation providing benefits for cyclists even though the speed limit is just 30 km/h on the roads.

There is a video showing where this path goes here:
www.youtube.com/watch
Other:
Good practice
general
11530Photo #11530Here a well surfaced road for use only by tractors and bikes turns into an excellent cycle path through a new (and incomplete) housing estate - Kloosterveen. The path is four metres wide.

There is now a much longer video showing this route here:
www.youtube.com/watch

Since the photo was taken, this cyclepath has been upgraded.
Other:
Good practice
general
11529Photo #11529Typical Dutch bike path between villages.

In a location like this where traffic is lighter, you will find that a bidirectional path on just one side of the road is quite common. There is, of course, attention paid wherever someone might have to access something on the other side of the road. You can't see it in the photo but In this case, the other side of the road is actually a canal.
Other:
Good practice
general
11528Photo #11528Nice little country lane.

It's quite difficult to find anywhere without separate provision for cyclists, but it does exist where the speed limit is low and there is virtually no traffic. This road provides access to a couple of farm buildings and fields.
Other:
Misc
general
11527Photo #11527Approaching a small village outside Assen on the cyclepathOther:
Good practice
general
11526Photo #11526Proper use of armco barriers to keep cyclists on the bike path safe.

A view of this path with a cyclist for scale is shown in #11783.

The path is four metres wide.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11525Photo #11525Older, but good quality bike path on the side of a relatively minor road right at the edge of Assen in the Netherlands.

Four metres wide.
Other:
Good practice
general
11524Photo #11524Bike path in Pittelo, Assen.

Four metres wide, amazingly smooth and also provides for service vehicles to get to the canal.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11523Photo #11523Canal path in Assen, Netherlands. Very smooth and about 3.5 m wide. Dog walkers and runners have a separate path behind the trees to the right.

A better image from close by is #11713.
Other:
Good practice
general
11196Photo #11196'Hybrid' cycle lane provision in Groningen, Netherlands. These paths are on-road, thus giving cyclists the usual visibility and priority over sideroads, but there is some kind of physical demarcation between the cycle lane and the carriageway.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11195Photo #11195'Hybrid' cycle lane provision in Groningen, Netherlands. These paths are on-road, thus giving cyclists the usual visibility and priority over sideroads, but there is some kind of physical demarcation between the cycle lane and the carriageway.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
9747Photo #9747Is this enough cycle parking I wonder?

See more recent photo / video at #12825
Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
9459Photo #9459Riding out from GroningenCycleway:
Good practice
cycleways

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