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All photos in & around Assen

Showing items 401 to 500 from total of 533 items. Ordered by photo # descending.

Photo # Icon Photo Caption Categorisation
12300Photo #12300Temporary bike parking stands which previously were deployed in a totally routine manner on a local building site so that workers could use them and now awaiting collection.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
12299Photo #12299Bike parking on the other side of Assen railway station.

There is a lot of bike parking here, just as there is everywhere else around the city.

Also see #12021 for a view of the parking at the front side of the station.
Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
12296Photo #12296Excellent signs are placed all over the Dutch national cycle path networkRoute sign:
Good practice
routesigns
12272Photo #12272Post card from the local government advertising what is being done on newly upgraded rural cyclepaths - which are branded fietsroute+.

The points in the green dots:

o Clearly signposted
o Easy and safe crossings
o Minimum of 2.5 m width (this is the width of the path on each side of the road, each of which is for a single direction)
o Socially safe shelters en route
o A direct route from A to B
o Surface of concrete or asphalt with no or little roughness.

On the back it reads "Cycling in Drenthe gets still more enjoyable and safer. Several cycle paths in our province are being upgraded to a Fietsroute+. Assen to Vries is the first" (see #11773 where some photos of several kilometres of this route are shown).

"As well as the cycle path, the bus stops along the route are being improved. There is more room for parking bikes and later this year new shelters." (there is a photo of a bus stop en-route here: #11776).

Provincie Drenthe, Drenthe local government and the regional Groningen-Assen sit together for a cycling network of high quality. In the regional area of Groningen-Assen, 15 routes are to be improved to Fietsroute+ level".
General sign/notice:
Good practice
signs
12271Photo #12271Excellent wide and smooth segregated cycle path following on from #12270.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
12270Photo #12270Bridge built over a ditch so that cyclists can continue to be segregated from motor traffic on this narrow section of road.

Note that drivers at one point along here have to give way to oncoming vehicles. Cyclists avoid the problem of having the slow down by using this bridge, so progress is faster by bike.

The bend at the end isn't quite so sharp as it looks in the photo.

A view of the path just before this point is shown in #12269. A view of the path following this point is shown in #12271.

There are countless bridges like this in the area and it's perhaps worth nothing that every single one has a non-slip surface so that it is safe to use when wet.

A view of crossing this bridge at speed from the opposite direction is shown in #12369.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
12269Photo #12269An example of how segregation allows motorists to be controlled without adversely affecting cyclists.

At this location the road narrows and bends and it is necessary to give one direction of travel on the road a higher priority than the other. It could be a dangerous place for cycling - except that cyclists are kept well clear of drivers.

In this instance, a long and wide bridge over the ditch has been built to allow cyclists to keep away. This is shown in #12270
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
12268Photo #12268The entirely rural 30 km/h around the village of Deurze. This zone is about 1.5 km long on mostly empty rural roads with just a few houses. The other end of the 30 km/h zone shown in #12136

"Let op, rechts heeft voorrang" is to tell people travelling along here to give way to traffic emerging from the right. Unless there are road markings to indicate otherwise you always give way to traffic from the right in the Netherlands, even if it's emerging from a minor road.
General sign/notice:
Good practice
signs
12267Photo #12267Bicycle inner-tube vending machine.

The sign reads "Never more without... Continental cycle inner tubes". Also someone had written on Euro-5.50 (the price of an innertube).

It's not particularly unusual to see boxes attached to buildings to serve cyclists. See the "Rijwiel Hulpkist" #12781.

Assen, Netherlands.
Bike shop:
Good practice
bikeshops
12138Photo #12138Memorial to the crew of Lancaster Mk III JB 154 which crashed at this site near Assen in the Netherlands on the 20th of October 1943 at 22:45 when returning from Leipzig.

The grey path is a smooth cycle path to the memorial. You can also drive here, but along the rough road surface this side of the path.
Other:
Misc
general
12137Photo #12137A relatively narrow, recreational cycle path in the Netherlands. However, it's still wide enough for two bikes to be side by side, it's surfaced with smooth tarmac, it's been gritted because it's cold, cleared of leaves and has signposts.

Cars have a parallel mud track.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
12136Photo #12136This sort of minor road in a village will have a 30 km/h speed limit in the Netherlands.

In this case, 1.5 km of road past just a few houses has this speed limit. The other end of the zone is shown in #12268
General sign/notice:
Good practice
signs
12135Photo #12135Minor road alongside the main road. I have no idea why anyone would prefer to ride on main-roads with lots of traffic when there is an alternative like this which has virtually no traffic on it except the cars belonging to the people in the few houses on the road and the odd tractor. It's marvellously smooth too.

Note also that this has been gritted (true to the word of the council in #12123).

Watch the video to see what it's like to ride on this road.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
12134Photo #12134A couple of days ago back in photo #12123 I added a photo of an article in the local newspaper where the council was promising to grit the paths once winter arrived. This Sunday morning I went for a ride of about 50 km and found virtually every cycle path I came to had been gritted, this one in the middle of a bit of forest included.

It's also clear of leaves, lovely and smooth and about 3 m wide.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
12123Photo #12123The council here in Assen publishes a couple of pages in the local paper each week about things that are going on. Today (15th November) this article was included:

--------------------

Gritting - Why bollards are removed in winter

Winter is on the way. While it has not yet frozen or snowed, the city is preparing for this.

The city has more to do this year than previous years. So that paths remain passable the city has had to produce a new gritting plan. Planners are set on making it as safe as possible.

This month the bollards on some cyclepaths are being removed. This is so that the gritting lorries can access the paths and grit them.

Naturally this does not mean you can drive your car on cycle paths.

--------------------

The poles referred to are actually very rare and never cause an obstruction. One is visible here: #11534. How marvellous that I can look forward to a winter of being able to continue to use the cycle paths. Of course, it helps that cycle paths here are always wide enough to drive a truck on, that they're surfaced well enough to withstand such weight, and that drivers told not to drive on the cycle paths won't do so.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
12119Photo #12119Today the children's bikes were inspected at school. A police officer comes to the school premises to test all the kid's bikes once per year. It's quite a job as virtually all kids bring their bikes to school.

The result: A sticker saying "Deze Fiets is OK" ("This bike is OK") on the rear mudguard alongside the longer standing Cambridge Cycling Campaign sticker.
Bicycle:
Good practice
bicycles
12118Photo #12118This used to be one of the main roads to the centre of the city, but now it's a "bicycle road" and used by cars only for access. Motorists have been given a different (less direct) route.

While these look like 1.5 m bike lanes each side of a 2.1 m car lane, they are no such thing. The whole road is in effect a cycle path, but one on which residents in the half a dozen houses on this road may drive their cars.

The road is a dead end to cars at both ends, but a through route for cyclists. It provides the most direct route to the middle of the city from a new housing estate.

The video shows the bike path which leads to the road.

Mud on the road is due to the considerable number of construction traffic currently using this road.

Another view of this road is shown in #11872
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
12111Photo #12111Alice on a bicycle in the Toy Museum at Roden, Netherlands (Speelgoedmuseum "Kinderwereld")Bicycle:
Misc
bicycles
12106Photo #12106Alternative view of new path construction also shown in #12105

The camera shows the direction of the cycle path, which also turns right to cross the bridge. The van is parked parallel with the road that the path crosses at this point and shows the size of the cycle paths - four metres wide.

When the photo was taken it was already very smooth though the top layer had yet to be laid. After completion, it's wonderful.

To see the path in use after completion, see #12301
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
12105Photo #12105View of the construction of a new lifting bridge on the canal at Groene Dijk in Assen.

The existing bike path has been moved towards the camera and a new crossing will be installed to cross the road (in one go and with no obstacles).

The bike path is about the same width as a single lane of the road. No bike path follows the line of the road to the left of the photo as there are only relatively major (i.e. 70 km/h speed limit) roads in that direction. There is a perfectly sensible way to travel in that direction at the next left turn, by the existing bridge (just visible at the left of the photo) which is going to be left for cycles and local cars only.

The surface quality of this path is already very good even though it has yet to receive its top layer.

A different view is shown in #12106

To see the path in use after completion, see #12301
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
12080Photo #12080Heading out of the village of Bovensmilde on the bike path.

At the point where the bicycle is, the path changes from village to inter-village and the surface changes.

The path is smooth, wide and suitable for cycling.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
12079Photo #12079This looks like a road with just narrow cycle lanes. However, it's actually a road used by hardly any cars at all, as there's nowhere to get to by car and no way of using it as a through road. The car in the photo will have to do a right or left turn soon and head out of the centre rather than towards it. The speed limit is of course 30 km/h.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
12078Photo #12078Sign within "pedestrianized" area showing limits on delivery vehicles.

In this street they are allowed:

Monday to Thursday 7:00 - 13:00 and 17:30 - 20:00.

Friday 7:00 - 13:00

Saturday 7:00 - 11:00 and 17:00 - 18:00.

Normally this street is used only by cyclists and pedestrians.
General sign/notice:
Good practice
signs
12066Photo #12066It may seem frivolous, but space to do daft things like this on bikes (or not on bikes) seems to be provided in the Netherlands.

This extreme mountain biking action was made possible only by reserving space for it and by building an artificial hill.

Personally, I think this is a very good thing.
Other:
Good practice
general
12065Photo #12065View of the bike path which takes workers to the large NAM (Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij - Dutch Oil Company) headquarters in Assen. NAM is a good part of Shell.

Also see #12064
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
12064Photo #12064Nodding Donkey oil pump at the NAM (Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij - Dutch Oil Company) headquarters in Assen.

NAM is a good part of Shell, and the size of their headquarters reflects this.
Destination:
Misc
destinations
12060Photo #12060While cycling rates in Assen are already incredibly high by British standards, the fight to increase the rate of cycling still goes on. This was in today's (1st November 2007) local paper.

Since this time, the cycling rate in Assen has grown to over 41% of all journeys. The new infrastructure is a good part of the reason why such growth has been possible.
Other:
Good practice
general
12021Photo #12021Cycle parking at Assen station. There really are quite a lot of bikes here for a city of 63000 people. Play the video to get an idea of how many. Not all the bikes are in this park - there is another similar cycle park on the opposite side of the station.

The amount of cycle parking here is considered to be inadequate and is being increased to 2300 places. That's one for every twenty eight residents.

Note the easy route from station platform to the cycle parking.

See also #12299 for a view of the parking at the other side of the station.

More on the increase in cycle parking here:
hembrow.blogspot.com/2009/01/more-cycle-parking-at-assen-railway.html
Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
11981Photo #11981Equivalent of A-frame shop, but with bike parking built in.

Not the greatest quality of parking, but how marvellous to see a shop adding a bit to the available parking.

Assen, Netherlands.
Cycle parking:
Misc
cycleparking
11873Photo #11873Wonderful canal path. Other views are at #11713 and #11784, but this one provides video.

The path has the standard width of four metres.

Upgraded in 2011. See #33320
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11872Photo #11872Old main road being re-worked into a "bicycle road" which gives priority to cyclists. Through motorised traffic is being sent by a different (longer, less direct) route over a new bridge #12105). This will consist of two large red cycle lanes either side with a very narrow car lane in the middle.

The bike lanes are 1.5 m each and the black strip in the middle is 2.1 m.

Such treatment is only suitable where very low car traffic volumes are expected - as is the case here. This road is being bypassed.

Volumes of cycle traffic here have grown since completion.

Another (later) view of this road is shown in #12118

And a view of the road and bridge in rush hour is to be seen here: hembrow.blogspot.com/2008/09/rush-hour.html
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11871Photo #11871Typical bike path alongside a fairly busy rural roadCycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11870Photo #11870What use is a set of photos of the Netherlands unless at least one windmill is included ?Destination:
Misc
destinations
11832Photo #11832Cycle parking at a primary school. Run the video to see how much and where this is.

Note that primary schools tend only to have a couple of hundred children who will almost certainly come from under a kilometre away.

There are no walls or gates around the school. It is quite unusual for schools to have gates in the Netherlands.

One possible route to this school is shown in the two previous photos and videos.

A video showing the number of bikes that arrive at this school each day is here:
nl.youtube.com/watch
Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
11831Photo #11831New school in Kloosterveen outside Assen. Note the high quality of construction, including novel features such as a green roof. Also note how the cycle path leads directly to the cycle parking.

The previous photo includes part of the run up to this photo and video. The next one includes a view of the cycle parking at the primary school next door.

To see the children riding to school here, see this video:
nl.youtube.com/watch
Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
11830Photo #11830Brand new housing estate at Kloosterveen near Assen. This shows the excellent cycle path alongside homes. Cars are permitted to park between trees. There is a special mesh which protects the greenery. Also, even though these are smaller terraced houses, each house has a driveway (or at least the possibility of having one), so at least 2, sometimes 3 or more, cars can be parked by each house without being either on the road, the pavement or in the way of cyclists on the cyclepath.

View the video to see how the driver gives way at the junction between road and cycle path.

This cycle path is 3 metres wide.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11829Photo #11829One of many small paths in an area of mixed heath and forest just a couple of minutes cycle from the city of Assen. Anyone can escape the city and get out into some greenery on their bikes with ease.

While all these paths are well surfaced, a couple of metres wide, smooth and usable in any weather. They fall a bit short of the standard for commuting paths, but bear in mind that they are intended for leisure only. A consequence of building a new housing development is not only that developers are expected to put in paths suitable for commuters, but that they will also provide such leisure paths.

(exact position difficult to work out! It's one of these...)

Nearly a year later, this rather better video was made in much the same location:

nl.youtube.com/watch
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11806Photo #11806The new cycle path on Vaart ZZ. This replaces what was already a fully segregated path, with a better quality version of the same. It's decently wide (three metres) so not even a "steam" roller on the path (here as part of the works) can block it.Obstruction:
Good practice
obstructions
11805Photo #11805Update April 2008: A meeting with city officials brought the information that this is only a secondary path in this direction. The primary bike route is to be 5 metres wide and parallel with this one on the other side of the canal.

The "bicycle road" on the other side of the canal while under construction is shown in #13318.

This is a new three metre wide cycle path on Vaart ZZ with a pedestrian pavement of around 2.5 metres. The road and bike path are both being improved here. In the case of the cycle path, an existing segregated path is being replaced with a better one, and the road junctions are being made more favourable to cyclists. There will be a grass verge between the bike path and road.

To make room for all this, the canal has been shifted sideways in a northerly direction. On the north side of the canal, the road is being reduced to not much more than a cycle path.

Note how they have finished the pavement and cycle path first. The road is coming later on the rough ground to the right of my bicycle.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11804Photo #11804The centre of Assen. As ever this demonstrates the wide demographics of cyclists in the Netherlands.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11803Photo #11803Assen town centre. The road isn't compltely pedestrianized, however motor vehicles are not allowed here all the time. In practice this works very well for cycling.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11802Photo #11802Start of a combined cycle and car underpass. Note how the bike part doesn't go so deep as the car bit because it doesn't have to allow for high vehicles. Because of this, the gradients are less for cycles. Also note that this is a bidirectional path, but is on both sides of the road.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11801Photo #11801Long cycle underpass which goes beneath the railway, railway station and two roads roads. The cycle path is four metres wide. For some of the distance it also has a 2 metre pavement for pedestrians, but at this end they come out in a separate place.

Watch the video to see the underpass in use.

This provides a very well used route between housing to the east of the railway line and the city centre.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11800Photo #11800Segregated cycle path in Assen. This would be exceptional by UK standards, with side roads giving way to the bike path etc. However, it now falls below what is required here, the tiles are a little bit rough and the width is just 3 metres. It is scheduled for renewal in a couple of years and will become a four metre wide tarmac path.

February 2009: The path has now been resurfaced. See #15787
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11787Photo #11787Bridge on cycle path in Assen. This is a very old cycle path crossing an even older bridge. The path is 3 metres wide, but narrows to a mere 2.5 metres over the bridge. This is the narrowest cycle path I've found in this area.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11786Photo #11786Part of Eliza's commute to and from school. Despite appearances, this is very much an _urban_ cycle route. It just happens to pass through one of the many small woods in Assen.

The path is tarmac and very smooth and wide with no signs of the roots of any of those trees breaking through the surface.

As it is not a major route, this is narrower than usual: just 3 metres wide.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11785Photo #11785This minor road is about to turn into a dirt track passable only by tractors... but not for cyclists, who continue to have a nice smooth tarmac surface to ride on. Watch the video to see how this work.

One of the great advantages of a primarily segregated network is that it's so easy to make conditions for cyclists better than conditions for motorists.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11784Photo #11784A view from a bridge of the canal path shown in #11713.

This lovely bike path is very well used by cyclists, roller skaters etc.

Upgraded in 2011. See #33320

It is the standard width of four metres wide.

For a video of this path see #11873.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11783Photo #11783Another view of the bridge shown in #11525 and #11526, but with a cyclist for scale showing how wide the cycle path is: four metres.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11782Photo #11782When there isn't a cycle path, speed limits on the roads are low. The speed limit on this rural road is 50 km/h, or around 30 mph.General sign/notice:
Good practice
signs
11781Photo #11781Following a group of "racers" into the village of Zeijen.

They've been riding three abreast for as long as I've seen them with no trouble whatsoever from any traffic. The sign indicates the speed limit on all the village's roads, including the main one through the middle, in km/h, so this equates to around 18 mph.
Bicycle:
Good practice
bicycles
11780Photo #11780Yet another example of a side road giving way to a cycle path. This is the other side of the road from the sequence shown from #11773.

Note how the 2.5 m wide concrete surface passes through the road. Cyclists definitely have priority here.

It's also worth a look at the Google Maps images which show how this road junction used to be. The road always gave way to the cycle path, but the road entrance used to be much wider and with more sweeping "high speed" corners than it has now.

By British standards, the previous arrangement would have been truly exceptional, but the Dutch have moved past that to a safer arrangement, despite the inconvenience to drivers.

Note that the crossing is set back from the main road by more than a car length in order that cars entering or leaving the main road have somewhere to stop without blocking the route of cyclists. Also note that this is achieved with very large radii corners for cyclists to negotiate, while drivers have to negotiate much tighter radii in order to turn in or out of the road.

To see the way that this path continues right into the city, see the video at #12598
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11779Photo #11779The cycle paths in the Netherlands are suitable for high speed riding and are well used by racing cyclists travelling at speed.

They're difficult to photograph as they're difficult to keep up with. I huffed and puffed on my 3 speed to get within striking distance of this guy before he disappeared into the distance.

This is the cycle path on the other side of the road from the sequence shown from #11773. Another view of this path showing the treatment of a side road is shown in #11780.

To see the way that cyclists get from this path into the city, see the video at #12598
Bicycle:
Good practice
bicycles
11778Photo #11778We started in Assen and now we're in the middle of Vries - almost half way to Groningen. To get here we have followed a fantastic smooth and wide cycle path to which side roads give way, and now that we're in Vries, for the first time in many kilometres we're being asked to give way to cars.

The bike path continues to Groningen, but this is the last photo of our sequence.

The first photo was #11773. Start back there and to see all the photos and videos of this sequence. Or if you want to see a few views of the return path on the other side of the road, go to #11779 and #11780.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11777Photo #11777Cycle path going smoothly behind a garage in order to prevent cyclists having to be careful of drivers entering and leaving the garage forecourt.

Note that an equivalent quality cycle path on the other side of the road is used by cyclists heading in the opposite direction.

Part of a sequence which starts at #11773 and ends at #11778 showing a well used commuter route. #11778 is the next part.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11776Photo #11776Bus stop with covered cycle parking behind in the wooden shed. It is very common for bus stops to have cycle parking, and on a work day they are very well used (this photo was taken on Sunday morning).

This is part of a sequence of photos from #11773 to #11778. #11777 is the next part.

Note that the cycle path is between the bus-stop and the cycle parking. Cyclists do not get cut up by buses using this stop.
Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
11775Photo #11775Arriving in Vries from Assen. We've had a journey of around 6 km so far on this superb path. The sequence of photos starts at #11773 and ends at #11778. #11776 is the next part.

There is an identical path on the other side of the road for cyclists heading in the opposite direction.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11774Photo #11774Continuation of cycle path to the next town,. This is part of a sequence of photos and videos starting at #11773 and ending in #11778. #11775 is the next part.

This is unidirectional, there is an identical path on the other side of the road for cyclists heading in the other direction. Because it is unidirectional it can be narrower at just 2.5 metres wide.

The concrete surface is extremely smooth. Watch the video and you'll see how side-roads give way to this bike path.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11773Photo #11773Four metre wide cycle path past an industrial estate. Very wide and well used, even at the weekend.

Note the racing cyclist coming in the opposite direction. People ride such bikes at speed on these paths quite freely because they are good enough in quality to use at speed.

Also note that at the road crossing the light is green for us before we arrive. This is because this junction defaults to being green for bikes. Drivers who wish to turn into or leave the side road have to wait for the light to change. Also, we can go straight across several lanes of road with no problems at all.

After viewing this photo and video, please keep going forwards in sequence. The next photo in the sequence is #11774.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11728Photo #11728An example of excellent segregation of bikes and cars on a brand new housing estate. Bikes are this side of the water, cars are the other side of the water.

This cycle path is 3 metres wide.

In this case, both cars and bikes are allowed on both sides, but of course as cars can't get out at this end of the path on this side, no through motor traffic arises here, leaving a very quiet space for people.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11722Photo #11722The canal is crossed by a series of lifting bridgesOther:
Infrastructure
general
11721Photo #11721Segregated cycle facility... We're this side of the canal, the cars are the other side of the canal.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11720Photo #11720These arches over the cycle path appear to have been installed for no reason other than that they're nice to have.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11719Photo #11719Nice smooth tarmac cycle path through the countryside in the middle of nowhere.

There is an enormous network of these. They're ideal for recreational rides.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11718Photo #11718Nice wide cycle path near recreational areas outside the city.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11717Photo #11717This very narrow road gives way to two different cycle paths within 50 metres of one another.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11716Photo #11716Excellent new cycle paths in a new housing estate providing for families to ride bikes with children in complete safety.

The main cycle path is four metres wide. It is crossed by a 3 metre wide path with a 2 metre pavement alongside.
Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
11715Photo #11715Excellent new cycle path in the standard four metre width.

This path links the new development of Kloosteveen with Assen in the Netherlands.

#11714 includes video near this location.

This cycle path, between the new development and the city, was built with the equivalent of "planning gain" or S106 money, so cost the council nothing.

For more on Kloosterveen: hembrow.blogspot.com/search/label/kloosterveen
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11714Photo #11714Excellent cycle path in the standard four metre width. Following from the video which gets us to this location, watch #12118 which follows on from here.

This cycle path, between the new development and the city, was built with the equivalent of "planning gain" or S106 money, so cost the council nothing.

For more on Kloosterveen: hembrow.blogspot.com/search/label/kloosterveen
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11713Photo #11713Nice wide path alongside the canal. There's enough space here for four bikes abreast, so if you're riding with a friend and someone else is riding with a friend in the opposite direction it doesn't cause a problem. Pedestrians and dog walkers have another path the other side of the ditch to the right in the photo.

Note also the demographics of cycling in the Netherlands. The two women at the front are of pension age and out for a spin on a Sunday afternoon. Following closely behind is a young couple with a baby on the bike, followed by a middle-aged couple. Everyone cycles here.

This path is 4 metres wide.

For another view, see #11784 or for video see #11873.

Upgraded in 2011. See #33320
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11687Photo #11687Cycle path alongside Het Kanaal. The road is on the opposite side of the canal behind the vegetation to the left of the image.

This degree of segregation combined with excellent quality cycle paths makes cycling a pleasure. It also makes cycling a lot more convenient than driving.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11686Photo #11686Crossing Het Kanaal on an excellent bridge. There are many such bridges. The bike path is on the far side of the river while the road is on the side where the camera is.

There are countless bridges like this in the area and it's perhaps worth nothing that every single one has a non-slip surface so that it is safe to use when wet.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11685Photo #11685Bike path junction with road. Once you get away from this junction, excellent segregation between road and cycle path is achieved by the road being on this side of Het Kanaal (a canal), while the cycle path is on the opposite side (in the next two photos).

While the give way marks are on the cycle path at this junction, in practice I find that drivers give way to bikes at least as often as the other way around.

The central reservation doesn't look very wide in this view, but it's actually plenty wide enough for a cyclist to wait in the middle, even if riding a tandem or pulling a trailer.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11684Photo #11684Crossing the entrance / exit from a new underground carpark. Unusually, bikes give way to cars at this point, though as very few cars ever seem to be here it doesn't cause a problem.

Perhaps the choice of priority is determined by driver's outlook being obscured.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11683Photo #11683This photo has been superseded by the photo and video at #12360.

Bikes inside a covered mall shopping area in Assen parked outside the Albert Heijn supermarket.

No-one seems to mind bikes being ridden through here. They also don't worry too much about dogs being taken through here. I've even seen a dog being towed through in a bike trailer. No-one bats an eyelid. How different from the UK !
Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
11682Photo #11682A different style of bike parking. This rack grips the wheel but is not a "wheelbender" because it grips a larger proportion of the circumference of the wheel. There is an extra arm which holds bikes more securely and allows for locking. Also the wall around the cycle parking helps to keep bikes secure. Note that while an enormous amount of parking is provided (see "More photos nearby"), it still isn't nearly enough and a lot of bikes are parked elsewhere.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
11681Photo #11681More of Assen's bikes by the Koopmansplein.

Note that the "wheelbender" type of rack shown here is quite common but does not cause the problems you might expect due to being a little larger in size than often seen in the UK.

It is quite normal for very practical bikes to be seen parked all the way around the plein.
Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
11680Photo #11680Bikes parked next to the Koopsmansplein in Assen. There is a similar layer of bikes all around the plein as you can see if you look closely next to the ice cream stall at the far side. Some bikes are parked at stands, but while there are a huge number of stands this still isn't enough for all of Assen's bikes. Luckily most people ride sensible bikes with stands and build in locks which can make the most of spaces without racks. Cycle theft is relatively low here.

Assen has slightly lower than the national average of cycle journeys at "just" 37% (yes, thirty seven percent) of journeys by bike, which apparently translates into 70000 journeys per day by bike in a city with a population of 63000.
Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
11679Photo #11679Entering a lower capacity street. This is a single direction bike path leading to a low speed street with on street bike lanes.

The woman in the red jacket is on the wrong side of the road. Building paths as wide as they are here means that such mis-use doesn't cause any immediate problem. Also note that the people on the pavement are well clear of the cyclists.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11678Photo #11678Brand new fully segregated path approaching a junction. Note how the entrances for driveways are kept deliberately narrow so that drivers have to take care crossing the cycle path.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11677Photo #11677New segregated provision replacing older style hybrid path.

Note how plenty of room is given for overtaking, for car doors etc. and how cyclists are sensibly segregated from both pedestrians and motorists.

Where the path meets a side road, it takes a line such that the conflicts are reduced and cars give way to cyclists.

This is, of course, a single direction path. There is also an identical one on the other side of the road.

Note how in the video you cross a side road which has give way markings either side of it. This is to give cyclists priority over traffic emerging from the side road and over cars turning into the side road.

For more on Groningerstraat:
hembrow.blogspot.com/search/label/groningerstraat
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11676Photo #11676New properly segregated path replacing older hybrid style provision. Also note that the road is being reduced from three lanes at this point to two.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11675Photo #11675New not yet completed cycle path replacing older "hybrid" pathCycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
11635Photo #11635You see these posts around occasionally. It reads (English first, then Dutch):

This is a climate wood. These trees are at this moment busy tieing up CO2. That is desperately needed, for CO2 discharge is an important cause of climate change.

The 12 provincies and landscape organisations work here on the solution to the climate problem.

And what are you doing ?

Look at www.klimaatbosje.nl

Dit is een klimaatbosje. Deze bomen zijn op dit moment bezig CO2 te binden. Dat is hard nodig, want CO2-uitstoot is een belangrijke oorzaak van klimaatverandering.

De 12 provinciale Landschappen en landschapsbeheer Nederland werken hier aan de oplossing van het klimaatprobleem.

En wat doet U ?

Kijk op www.klimaatbosje.nl
General sign/notice:
Good practice
signs
11627Photo #11627When service vehicles (this is is for an electricity and gas supply company) need to access areas which are only accessible by bike and footpath they can do so without greatly inconveniencing cyclists too much because the paths were built with sensible proportions in the first place.

Also, because this is just a bike path and not a road, no amount of irresponsible parking can result in cyclists having to ride out into fast flowing traffic.

Photo taken in Assen, Netherlands.

The cycle path is four metres wide, the pavement 2.5 metres.
Obstruction:
Good practice
obstructions
11626Photo #11626Sound barriers being installed along a road which is being widened in Assen.

The road is being widened from 1 lane each way to 2 lanes each way. Even though the road will have only a 70 km/h speed limit (44 mph), the problem of noise from roads is thought to be serious enough that the sound needs to be stopped.

Note the scale of these barriers. They're substantial concrete at least 3 m tall, with occasional see through plastic panels to be added later.
Other:
Good practice
general
11625Photo #11625Excellent bike path and pavement next to one of the Kinderboerderijen in Assen. There's some kind of donkey in that field if you look closely.

This is one of our alternative routes to one of the schools and to the centre of the city.
Other:
Good practice
general
11624Photo #11624Kinderboerderij in Assen. This is a city farm for children (and adults) to visit. Most residential areas across the country have one of these. We know of six in Assen so far.

Like many such things, this is not car friendly at all. It is reachable only by bike or on foot.

If you look closely near the centre of the image you'll see that a few chicks have escaped through the fence onto the footpath.
Destination:
Good practice
destinations
11623Photo #11623Single stage crossing of very wide road, both the road and bike path have been upgraded since the google maps imagery was created.Other:
Good practice
general
11622Photo #11622Four metre wide and smooth bidirectional bike path beside a very large road. Note that all cycle crossings of this road are single stage crossings.Other:
Good practice
general
11621Photo #11621Four metre wide, smooth bidirectional bike path next to large road.Other:
Good practice
general
11620Photo #11620High capacity bike path and road crossing. The priority here may not be obvious to English viewers. The Dutch expect to give way to traffic from the right at junctions like this, so priority for bikes and cars is equal.Other:
Good practice
general
11619Photo #11619Junction between bike paths, all some distance from roads. Note also that the grey concrete is a separate pavement. Shared use paths are not used in the Netherlands (though sometimes pedestrians do walk on bike paths).

However, first go back to #11615 and press next until you get back here to see a sequence of photos before the video.

After this video, take a look at #12346 which shows a view of the same path going in the opposite direction and nearly reaching the same spot as this one does.
Other:
Good practice
general
11618Photo #11618Fully segregated bike path in 30 km/h residential area. The path takes a more direct route than the road, and drivers in cars have to give way when the path and road cross.Other:
Good practice
general
11617Photo #11617Fully segregated bike path in 30 km/h residential area.Other:
Good practice
general
11616Photo #11616Fully segregated bike path in 30 km/h area. The road gives way to the bike path at this junction, where the path and road crossOther:
Good practice
general
11615Photo #11615Full segregated bike path in area with 30 km/h speed limit.

This gives benefits because traffic calming can be applied to the road while cyclists continue unimpeded.

At crossings, drivers give way to cyclists.

Also, cyclists can take a more direct route through the area than drivers.
Other:
Good practice
general
11604Photo #11604Hunebed near Assen. Drenthe has quite a lot of these ancient monuments, and they're reachable easily by bike.

And yes, you do seem to be allowed to climb all over them.
Destination:
Misc
destinations
11580Photo #11580Cycle path crossing the entrance to a 30 kph minor road in a residential area in Assen. The road gives way to the cycle path.

Note that the cycle path is raised above the road, and where the road crosses the cycle path it rises to the same height, creating a "speed bump". The road on the left has a 30 km/h speed limit, the larger road on the right a 50 km/h speed limit.
Other:
Good practice
general
11579Photo #11579Traffic safety is taken very seriously at the school. It's already well in advance of that at a typical British school. No parking of cars on the pavement and a very high rate of cycling and walking. However, this is clearly something which they feel needs to be re-enforced:

Junior version of the highway code "Do you know the traffic rules?"

Handed out to all Dutch primary school children.
Other:
Good practice
general

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